Marthasville secures land for new well, beginning work by November

Posted 9/30/21

Engineers managing the project to build a new city well and massive water tank in Marthasville expect a construction contractor to be selected and work to begin within the next two …

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Marthasville secures land for new well, beginning work by November

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Engineers managing the project to build a new city well and massive water tank in Marthasville expect a construction contractor to be selected and work to begin within the next two months.

Representatives for Cochran Engineering presented an updated timeline for the project during a Sept. 15 board of aldermen meeting. State permit applications for the well site will be submitted in October, with the first construction phase of site grading starting in November, said engineer Ryan Johanning.

Once grading at the well site is done, likely by January, drilling for the well will begin, said Johanning. Then construction of the well house facility and the water main connecting the well to the rest of the city will be completed as a third phase. Finally, construction of a 300,000-gallon storage tank and final site work will complete the project.

“We anticipate the well house, ground storage tank, water main, starting in February and March of next year, and we’re anticipating final site work in July,” Johanning said, adding that the well will immediately go into service thereafter.

One other important piece of progress is that the city now owns the land where the well and water tank will be built. Mayor David Lange said the city closed on the property northeast of town on Sept. 3 after long delays in its acquisition, which had also affected the timeline for the project.

Lange added that the city hasn’t actually settled on the exact size of the storage tank, and will likely accept bids for 300,000- and 400,000-gallon options.

“One’s 43-feet diameter, one’s 50, but they’re both 28 feet tall,” Lange said. “And there’s still enough room (at the site) that in 30 or 40 years ... if they need to put a sister tank there, it’s ready to go.”

To help acquire more favorable bids for the city, Lange said city workers will begin boring test holes to locate any underground rock at the well site. Engineers said having that information will help potential contractors submit accurate price estimates.

“It will allow you, going into the project, to have a better idea how much money the project is going to cost,” such engineer David Van Leer.

During the project update, aldermen also discussed the possibility of upgrading the technology at all of the city’s water and sewer facilities to provide remote monitoring and alert capabilities. Van Leer said Cochran will acquire information about what options are available for those capabilities and help the city coordinate with a vendor.

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